- Advertisement -

Dave Evanson Sells Memento.com for $148,000

Chris Evans’ Former Production Company Sells Ginger.com to Company With $120 Million in Funding

If you're a startup that has decided to brand yourself on a generic dictionary word, what is your domain name strategy? For Ginger, the founders...

Giuseppe Graziano Releases the Q3 Liquid Domains Report – $13.36 Million in Escrow.com Sales

Giuseppe Graziano is the founder of GGRG domain brokerage and LMX.com, the liquid domain marketplace. Every quarter, he releases a liquid domain report in...

After Getting $106,769 for VanInsurance.co.uk, the Seller Wants $150,000 for VanInsurance.uk

Yesterday, GoDaddy released its first domain sales list in five years. It's a significant moment for a publicly listed company to willingly disclose data...

How Do We Break the Domaining Echo Chamber?

Over the last six months, I've reduced my social media usage significantly, but over the weekend I did see a thought-provoking tweet from NameCorp...

Data Driven: Unicorn Upgrades – When Did They Happen? – Part 1

Unicorns. Aside from being mythical creatures, the term unicorn is also used to describe companies. In particular, privately held startup companies that are valued at $1 billion or more.

Most unicorn companies don't start out by owning their best, exact-match .COM domain name. When a company starts its life, domain names aren't necessarily a priority, so many opt for lesser names. Lesser names could include a prefix word (such as "Get" or "Try"), or they could be an alternative extension to .COM (such as .CO or .IO).

On their way to becoming a unicorn, many of these companies paid the sometimes vast amounts of money needed to acquire their exact-match .COM domain.

Sedo’s Dave Evanson has a history of recording six and seven-figure sales. In 2020 along, he has sold names such as Profitable.com for $200,000, and ElectricCar.com for $180,000. Today, Dave has announced another one-word domain that he’s sold for a six-figure fee.

The domain is Memento.com, and it was sold for $148,000 according to a tweet from Dave:

According to DomainIQ, Memento.com was sold on behalf of Syngenuity Limited, a company that is listed as owning other names including WUN.com, Quin.com, and FightingTalk.com among over a thousand other domains.

As of writing, Memento.com is pending a transfer, so it’s unclear who the buyer is. Although, based on Crunchbase’s search results, it could be one of a number of companies called Memento.

Inferior names such as Memento.photo are already developed, as well as names such as MementoPayments.com, and Icelandic payment platform that has raised over $750,000 in funding to date.

Based on the Crunchbase and trademark listings for the term “Memento,” it has a wide usage across many industries, making it difficult to determine who actually bought the name. However, at $148,000, it does seem like an end-user purchase rather than an investor.

It’ll be interesting to see where this name ultimately ends up, but regardless, Memento.com’s $148,000 sale should chart as the fifteenth highest sale of 2020 behind another Sedo sale, that of BettingTips.com for $150,000.

Do you think that $148,000 was a good sales price for Memento.com?

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Advertisement
Dave Evanson Sells Memento.com for 8,000

The Sales Roundup, GoDaddy Special: Why VanInsurance.co.uk Sold for $106,769, and More

This past week, GoDaddy disclosed a list of their top 20 domain sales for the month of June 2020. I'm going to be taking...

Chris Evans’ Former Production Company Sells Ginger.com to Company With $120 Million in Funding

If you're a startup that has decided to brand yourself on a generic dictionary word, what is your domain name strategy? For Ginger, the founders...

Giuseppe Graziano Releases the Q3 Liquid Domains Report – $13.36 Million in Escrow.com Sales

Giuseppe Graziano is the founder of GGRG domain brokerage and LMX.com, the liquid domain marketplace. Every quarter, he releases a liquid domain report in...